2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

About 3 million people visit the Taj Mahal every year. This blog was viewed about 36,000 times in 2010. If it were the Taj Mahal, it would take about 4 days for that many people to see it.

 

In 2010, there were 3142 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 3150 posts.

The busiest day of the year was December 3rd with 1,092 views. The most popular post that day was Surely the six best Leslie Nielsen lines | 24 Frames | Los Angeles Times.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were mail.yahoo.com, en.wordpress.com, facebook.com, blogs.ajc.com, and alphainventions.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for best leslie nielsen lines, nadia macri, patrick schwarzenegger, cordoba, and cartoon bed.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Surely the six best Leslie Nielsen lines | 24 Frames | Los Angeles Times December 2010
1 comment

2

Kanye West NUDE PHOTOS Being Shopped? Alleged Penis Pics Surface October 2010

3

This is obviously Arnold Schwarzenegger’s shirtless son October 2010
1 comment

4

Just in Case! How to Build Your Own Bedbug Detector at Home – TIME September 2010

5

Snyder vs. Phelps at the Supreme Court: a 1st Amendment test – latimes.com October 2010

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KKK founded: This Day in History — 12/24/1865

In Pulaski, Tennessee, a group of Confederate veterans convenes to form a secret society that they christen the “Ku Klux Klan.” The KKK rapidly grew from a secret social fraternity to a paramilitary force bent on reversing the federal government’s progressive Reconstruction Era-activities in the South, especially policies that elevated the rights of the local African American population.

The name of the Ku Klux Klan was derived from the Greek word kyklos, meaning “circle,” and the Scottish-Gaelic word “clan,” which was probably chosen for the sake of alliteration. Under a platform of philosophized white racial superiority, the group employed violence as a means of pushing back Reconstruction and its enfranchisement of African Americans. Former Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest was the KKK’s first grand wizard; in 1869, he unsuccessfully tried to disband it after he grew critical of the Klan’s excessive violence.

Most prominent in counties where the races were relatively balanced, the KKK engaged in terrorist raids against African Americans and white Republicans at night, employing intimidation, destruction of property, assault, and murder to achieve its aims and influence upcoming elections. In a few Southern states, Republicans organized militia units to break up the Klan. In 1871, the Ku Klux Act passed Congress, authorizing President Ulysses S. Grant to use military force to suppress the KKK. The Ku Klux Act resulted in nine South Carolina counties being placed under martial law and thousands of arrests. In 1882, the U.S. Supreme Court declared the Ku Klux Act unconstitutional, but by that time Reconstruction had ended and the KKK had faded away.

The 20th century witnessed two revivals of the KKK: one in response to immigration in the 1910s and ’20s, and another in response to the African American civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s.

via KKK founded — History.com This Day in History — 12/24/1865.

Festivus: December 23rd

Are you feeling a little left out!? You don’t celebrate Christmas or Chanukah. Kwanzaa just isn’t your thing. And, you don’t even know what Ramadan is.

Then, come and experience the joy and the Miracle of Festivus. One might say that the Festivus holiday is a miracle in itself.

Still not sure if Festivus is for you? It’s non-denominational. So, everyone can partake. The Festivus slogan is “A Festivus for the rest of us!” And, that means you, too. So………..

Happy Festivus to you!

The Origin of Festivus Holiday:

Festivus came into being as the direct result of a Jerry Seinfled television show episode. It first aired on December 18, 1997. The holiday was promoted by Kramer (who else!?)

The Festivus holiday was created by Seinfeld show scriptwriter Daniel O’Keefe. His dad, also named Daniel, had found reference to an obscure holiday called Festivus, which was first celebrated in 1966.

Festivus Traditions:

No, there isn’t a Festivus Tree. Rather, an unadorned aluminum pole is the symbol of Festivus.

The Festivus holiday is celebrated with a dinner. Meatloaf is the suggested main course (I betcha can’t wait for a slice of that!).

Dinner is followed by a “Feats of Strength”.

Another popular Festivus tradition, is an “Airing of Grievances” . This is where you can tell someone how disappointed you are over what they did or didn’t do during the past year.

via Festivus 2010 Festivus holiday Traditions at Holiday Insights.

Dreyfus affair begins in France: This Day in History — 12/22/1894

French officer Alfred Dreyfus is convicted of treason by a military court-martial and sentenced to life in prison for his alleged crime of passing military secrets to the Germans. The Jewish artillery captain, convicted on flimsy evidence in a highly irregular trial, began his life sentence on the notorious Devil’s Island Prison in French Guyana four months later.

The Dreyfus case demonstrated the anti-Semitism permeating France’s military and, because many praised the ruling, in France in general. Interest in the case lapsed until 1896, when evidence was disclosed that implicated French Major Ferdinand Esterhazy as the guilty party. The army attempted to suppress this information, but a national uproar ensued, and the military had no choice but to put Esterhazy on trial. A court-martial was held in January 1898, and Esterhazy was acquitted within an hour.

In response, the French novelist Émile Zola published an open letter entitled “J’Accuse” on the front page of the Aurore, which accused the judges of being under the thumb of the military. By the evening, 200,000 copies had been sold. One month later, Zola was sentenced to jail for libel but managed to escape to England. Meanwhile, out of the scandal a perilous national division was born, in which nationalists and members of the Catholic Church supported the military, while republicans, socialists, and advocates of religious freedom lined up to defend Dreyfus.

In 1898, Major Hubert Henry, discoverer of the original letter attributed to Dreyfus, admitted that he had forged much of the evidence against Dreyfus and then Henry committed suicide. Soon afterward, Esterhazy fled the country. The military was forced to order a new court-martial for Dreyfus. In 1899, he was found guilty in another show trial and sentenced to 10 years in prison. However, a new French administration pardoned him, and in 1906 the supreme court of appeals overturned his conviction. The debacle of the Dreyfus affair brought about greater liberalization in France, a reduction in the power of the military, and a formal separation of church and state.

via Dreyfus affair begins in France — History.com This Day in History — 12/22/1894.

Harry Chapin earns a #1 hit with “Cat’s In The Cradle”: 12/21/1985

Harry Chapin earned a reputation as a politically conscious singer-songwriter who dedicated himself, in the years before his untimely death, to various noble causes, including wiping out world hunger. Indeed, his greatest legacy may stem more from his charitable efforts than from his music itself, but for a brief period in the early 1970s, Harry Chapin was a legitimate pop star. On this day in 1974, he earned his one and only #1 pop hit when his bittersweet story-song “Cat’s In The Cradle” reached the top of the Billboard Hot 100.

Before turning his attention to music at the relatively advanced age of 29, Harry Chapin pursued a career as a film director, earning an Oscar nomination for his 1968 boxing documentary, Legendary Champions. In 1971, he recruited a backing band via an ad in The Village Voice and recorded his first album. Released in 1972, Heads & Tales included what many fans regard as Chapin’s signature song—”Taxi,” a lushly produced, six-minute-plus story song about a San Francisco cab driver and a long-lost love he picks up as a fare. Despite its length, “Taxi” became a hit, reaching #24 on the Billboard pop chart in the spring of 1972. Chapin’s second and third albums were nowhere near as successful as his first, and he’d turned his full-time attention to writing a Broadway show when his fourth album, Verities & Balderdash, unexpectedly became a smash hit on the strength of “Cat’s In The Cradle,” a tale of an absent father and an endless cycle of intergenerational dysfunction based on a poem written by Chapin’s wife.

“Cat’s In The Cradle” was Chapin’s last big hit, and though he retained a loyal fan base through the remainder of the 1970s, his work as a social activist during this period was far more significant than his work as a musician. Chapin is widely credited with spurring the creation of the President’s Commission on World Hunger in 1977, and he shares indirect responsibility for one of the biggest music charity efforts of all time, USA for Africa, which was organized by Chapin’s former manager, Ken Kragen. On the occasion of Chapin’s posthumous award of the Congressional Gold Medal in 1987, Kragen, who also organized Hands Across America, credited Chapin as his inspiration: “All of our efforts with hunger and homelessness began with Harry,” he said.

Born December 7, 1942, in New York City, singer-songwriter Harry Chapin was killed in an auto accident on the Long Island Expressway on July 16, 1981.

via Harry Chapin earns a #1 hit with “Cat’s In The Cradle” — History.com This Day in History — 12/21/1985.

“Old Blood and Guts” dies: This Day in History — 12/21/1945

On this day, General George S. Patton, commander of the U.S. 3rd Army, dies from injuries suffered not in battle but in a freak car accident. He was 60 years old.

Descended from a long line of military men, Patton graduated from the West Point Military Academy in 1909. He represented the United States in the 1912 Olympics-as the first American participant in the pentathlon. He did not win a medal. He went on to serve in the Tank Corps during World War I, an experience that made Patton a dedicated proponent of tank warfare.

During World War II, as commander of the U.S. 7th Army, he captured Palermo, Sicily, in 1943 by just such means. Patton’s audacity became evident in 1944, when, during the Battle of the Bulge, he employed an unorthodox strategy that involved a 90-degree pivoting move of his 3rd Army forces, enabling him to speedily relieve the besieged Allied defenders of Bastogne, Belgium.

Along the way, Patton’s mouth proved as dangerous to his career as the Germans. When he berated and slapped a hospitalized soldier diagnosed with “shell shock,” but whom Patton accused of “malingering,” the press turned on him, and pressure was applied to cut him down to size. He might have found himself enjoying early retirement had not General Dwight Eisenhower and General George Marshall intervened on his behalf. After several months of inactivity, he was put back to work.

And work he did-at the Battle of the Bulge, during which Patton once again succeeded in employing a complex and quick-witted strategy, turning the German thrust into Bastogne into an Allied counterthrust, driving the Germans east across the Rhine. In March 1945, Patton’s army swept through southern Germany into Czechoslovakia—which he was stopped from capturing by the Allies, out of respect for the Soviets’ postwar political plans for Eastern Europe.

Patton had many gifts, but diplomacy was not one of them. After the war, while stationed in Germany, he criticized the process of denazification, the removal of former Nazi Party members from positions of political, administrative, and governmental power. His impolitic press statements questioning the policy caused Eisenhower to remove him as U.S. commander in Bavaria. He was transferred to the 15th Army Group, but in December of 1945 he suffered a broken neck in a car accident and died less than two weeks later.

via “Old Blood and Guts” dies — History.com This Day in History — 12/21/1945.